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The BC Government has unveiled some of the rules relating to the forthcoming sale of wine in supermarkets in BC, which is slated for a spring 2015 start. As reported earlier, there are currently two sales "models" that are proposed. The first model is for "store within a store" sales such that an existing private or government retailer would be able to move inside a supermarket's floor space so long as the liquor sales were conducted in a segregated area with separate cashiers. The second model is proposed to permit the sale of 100% BC wine on regular supermarket shelves, for sale through designated regular checkouts. The new announcement (BC Takes the Next Step Towards Liquor in Grocery Stores) indicates that eligible stores must be at least 10,000 square feet and must have approximately 75% of their sales coming from food products. These restrictions will mean that liquor sales may take place, for the most part, only in "traditional supermarkets". Convenience stores and smaller food stores will not be eligible for alcohol sales as they will not meet the square foot requirement. In addition, the 75% requirement would exclude Wal-Mart and Costco, both of which hold large chunks of the grocery market, but neither of which would meet the 75% figure (each is about 50-55% for food sales). In addition, and as noted earlier, the 1 km distance separation requirement will remain in place ... which will mean that BC supermarkets will only be able to sell liquor if they purchase and move the licenses of any existing liquor stores that are located within 1 km of their stores.

Also, the press release noted that grocery and liquor stores will be permitted to "co-brand" (this is currently not permitted), that there will be no minimum requirement for the space allotted to liquor sales within a supermarket, and that further details regarding wholesale pricing reform and the supermarket sales models will be released during winter 2014-15. The final reforms are expected to be implemented in spring 2015, including the launch of supermarket sales, a "level playing field" for government and private liquor stores, and a complete re-write of the Liquor Control and Licensing Act.